Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, April 18-20, 2004

Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting
April 18-20, 2004
Hyatt Regency San Francisco
http://www.cogneurosociety.org/

Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting
April 18-20, 2004
Hyatt Regency San Francisco
http://www.cogneurosociety.org/

Reminder: Important Deadlines for the annual meeting are
approaching. See http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns/ for
more details.

Last Day to Receive Discounted Pre-Registration rate:
3/8/04 Hotel Reservations: 3/15/04
Last Day to Register before meeting (discounted rates do not
apply after 3/8/04 and registration must be competed using
the web): 4/2/04 Last day to receive Registration Refund:
4/2/04

Registration
The deadline for registration via the website is April 2,
2004 (discounted pre-registration will be given through
3/8/04.) All badges, programs, and printed receipts will be
issued at the meeting. All meeting events are open to those
wearing a meeting badge.

Register early to receive a discount on registration

Discounted Pre-Registration (by 3/8/04):

Regular Member Registration: $100
Regular Non-Member Registration: $160
Postdoc Member Registration: $75
Postdoc Non-Member Registration: $135
Student Member Registration: $35
Student Non-Member Registration: $80

Registration (after 3/8/04) and On-Site Registration:

Regular Member Registration: $130
Regular Non-Member Registration: $180
Postdoc Member Registration: $95
Postdoc Non-Member Registration: $150
Student Member Registration: $50
Student Non-Member Registration $90

Registration for the meeting will be handled online. To
register, proceed to our Online Registration Form
(http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns/registration.htm) and
pay with PayPal, a payment service that provides instant,
secure online payments. For more information about PayPal,
you can visit their website at http://www.paypal.com.

If you do not have a PayPal account, you will be directed to
the PayPal site to sign up for your account. With PayPal you
can pay by credit card or your debit card.

If you have problems with Paypal, please email
(CNSMeeting@TaraMillerEvents.com)us.

Pre-Registration Check In and On-Site Registration
Pre-registration check-in and On-site registration hours are
limited to those posted. It is highly recommended that you
pre-register to avoid delays at the meeting. To receive your
badge and program, if not mailed, pre-registrants must check
in at�the pre-registration check-in table. It�is
highly�recommended�that you check in�if possible on
Saturday
evening�between 5:30-7:30 pm to�avoid any delays on
Sunday.
No one will�be�admitted to�any�meeting�event
without�a
badge.

Saturday, April 17 — 5:30 pm- 7:30 pm (recommended)
Sunday, April 18 — 7:30 am- 4:30 pm
Monday, April 19 — 8:00 am- 2:30 pm
Tuesday, April 20 — 8:00 am- 12:00 pm

Refunds
The pre-registration fee will be refunded minus a handling
fee, provided the request for refund is received by CNS, no
later than 4/2/04. Refund requests must be submitted in
writing and be accompanied by the meeting program and
receipt, if these have been received.

Hotel Reservations
San Francisco Hyatt Regency. Call Group Reservations at
1-800-233-1234 or 415-788-1234 or online at Hyatt.com,
before March 7, 2004 to receive the special room rate of
$199 single/double.

Transportation
The official airline of CNS Meeting is American Airlines.
Call American Airlines Meeting Services desk toll free
number: 1-800-433-1790 to make a reservation. The ID code
for discounts is AA Contract Booking 16746. Avis car rental
discounts are also available. For discount, use code
AWD#B136000.

CNS Symposia 2004

For Speaker�s abstracts, please see
http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns/Symposia.htm

Sunday, 4/18/03, 8:30-10:30 am
Substance Abuse: A Disorder of Cognition and Brain
Chair:
Steven Grant, National Institute on Drug Abuse
Speakers:
Hugh Garavan, Trinity College
Julie A. Fiez, University of Pittsburgh
Kevin S. LaBar, Duke University
Julie C. Stout, Indiana University

This symposium highlights research by four new investigators
who are funded through an initiative by the National
Institute on Drug Abuse on the integration of basic
cognitive neuroscience and substance abuse. Their cognitive
and fMRI imaging studies represent the leading edge of the
emerging view that dysfunction of brain circuits involved in
fundamental cognitive processes make critical contributions
to the clinical features of substance abuse disorders. Dr.
Hugh Garavan will show that substance abusers exhibit
impairment in brain networks and executive functions
involved in cognitive control of automatic processes. Dr.
Julie Fiez will address how frontal cortical regions
interact with subcortical nuclei traditionally associated
with reward and emotion in the expectation, occurrence and
consumption of both drug and non-drug rewards. Dr. Kevin
LaBar will address how the amygdala, which has been
identified as one of key brain regions involved in the
response to drug cues and the experience of drug craving,

contributes to normal human emotional memory processes in
both the implicit and explicit domains. Dr. Julie Stout will
present a mathematical model of a decision-making task that
allows impaired decision-making performance by substance
abusers to be associated with specific cognitive processes.

Drug Addiction as an Executive Dysfunction: Cognitive
Neuroimaging Evidence
Hugh Garavan, Trinity College
The Neural Response to Monetary And Drug Cues:
Stimulus-Bound Versus Context-Dependent Processing
Julie A. Fiez, University of Pittsburgh
Emotional Memory Functions Of The Human Amygdala
Kevin S. LaBar, Duke University
Validity and Neurobiological Relevance of Formal Decision
Models of Substance Abuse
Julie C. Stout, Indiana University

Sunday, 4/18/03, 1:30-3:30 pm
The role of cognitive neuroscience in understanding atypical
developmental pathways

Chair:
Kim Cornish, McGill University
Speakers:
Annette Karmiloff-Smith, University of London
Kim Cornish, McGill University
Helen Tager-Flusberg, Boston University School of
Medicine
Jacob Burack, McGill University

The past decade has seen unparalleled advances in the
application of molecular genetic methods to the study of
neurodevelopmental disorders. Alongside this development
there has been a substantial growth in the number of studies
attempting to link genomic changes (deletion, reduplication
or silencing of genes) to cognitive endstates and brain
function, in essence to link genotype to phenotype. Recent
progress in brain imaging techniques, most notably
functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and
event-related potential (ERP), also provide exciting
opportunities to further delineate the impact of genetics on
brain development and the resulting cognitive system.

Using a cross-syndrome, multi-domain approach, this
symposium will demonstrate how recent developments in
cognitive neuroscience have facilitated our understanding of
the complex interaction between the genetic abnormality and
neuro-cognitive development. We will focus on four genetic
disorders that are strongly developmental in nature:
Williams syndrome, Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and
autism. The developmental pathways of these disorders will
be addressed within the context of the interplay among
multiple levels ranging from the biological and brain levels
, to the cognitive level, and then to the behavioral and
environmental levels.

Five ways of exploring genotype/phenotype relations
Annette Karmiloff-Smith, University of London
Linking genes to behavior in Fragile X syndrome: A
neurodevelopmental perspective
Kim Cornish, McGill University
The neurobiological basis of language disorder: Evidence
from autism
Helen Tager-Flusberg, Boston University School of
Medicine Developmental and neurocognitive markers in Down
Syndrome
Jacob Burack, McGill University

Monday, 4/19/03, 8:30-10:30 am
Patricia Goldman-Rakic�s influence on cognitive
neuroscience

Chair:
Mark D�Esposito, University of California, Berkeley
Speakers:
Joaquin Fuster, UCLA
Earl Miller, MIT
Mark D�Esposito, University of California, Berkeley
Robert T. Knight, University of California, Berkeley
Amy Arnsten, Yale University

This past year we lost one of the most influential
neuroscientists of our time � Patricia Goldman-Rakic. This
symposium will be presented in her honor, to celebrate her
contributions to neuroscience, and to provide the members of
the Cognitive Neuroscience Society a broad perspective of
her legacy. First, we turn to Joaquin Fuster to provide us
with his perspective of Goldman-Rakic�s scientific
contribution towards understanding the prefrontal cortex.
Next, four cognitive neuroscientists greatly influenced by
her work – Earl Miller, Mark D�Esposito, Robert Knight and
Amy Arnsten will comment on their perspective, having
utilized very different approaches to studying prefrontal
function both in animals and humans. This symposium will
provide personal insight into Patricia Goldman-Rakic�s
career, a historical overview of her contributions, and a
look to the future regarding the impact she has had on
theories of prefrontal function, and related issues in
cognitive and clinical neuroscience.

Introduction to Symposium
Joaquin Fuster, UCLA
The Neurophysiology of Working Memory and Cognitive Control
Earl Miller, MIT
Understanding Persistent Neural Activity: Insights from
Human Functional MRI
Mark D�Esposito, University of California, Berkeley
Unraveling the mystery of the human frontal lobe syndrome
Robert T. Knight, University of California, Berkeley
The neurochemical basis of working memory
Amy Arnsten, Yale University

Monday, 4/19/03, 1:30-3:30 pm
How sound inputs shape the auditory cortex

Chair:
Michael Merzenich, Ph.D, Keck Center for Integrative
Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco
Speakers:
Michael Merzenich, Ph.D, Keck Center for Integrative
Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco
Christo Pantev, Ph.D, Institute for Biomagnetism und
Biosignalanalysis, M�nster University Hospital
Sachiko Koyama, Ph.D, National Institute for
Physiological Sciences, Japan
Marie Cheour, Ph.D, University of Miami

Sound inputs play a crucial role in shaping the
auditory/aural speech cortex during early infancy. This
shaping influences the processing of spectrotemporally
complex sounds throughout an individual�s life. Sound
inputs
presented in a learning context can also drive large-scale
changes in auditory representations and in cortical response
patterns in older children and adults. Although an
individual�s language and music abilities are inevitably
affected by the history of developmental plasticity of the
auditory/aural speech cortex, determinant factors from this
�critical period� of development are just beginning to
be
understood. Similarly, the nature of, and the determinant
factors underlying brain response changes paralleling the
development of listening abilities in reception in the
acquisition of a second language, or in the development of
musical abilities, are just beginning to be understood. In
this symposium, we shall briefly summarize the state of this
rapidly emerging science, and shall describe some of its
many, important theoretical and practical implications. Our
goals are 1) to provide an update of the state of progress
in this exciting new field; 2) to compare and relate
provocative results from human and animal auditory cortex
studies; and 3) to find possible common grounds for
collaboratively linking future human and animal studies.

Critical period and adult plasticity in auditory cortex
models
Michael Merzenich, Ph.D, Keck Center for Integrative
Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco When
cortical neurons play music
Christo Pantev, Ph.D, Institute for Biomagnetism und
Biosignalanalysis, M�nster University Hospital The remains
of infant days: Auditory cortex responses to aural speech in
proficient late English learners
Sachiko Koyama, Ph.D, National Institute for
Physiological Sciences, Japan Learning during sleep in
infancy
Marie Cheour, Ph.D, University of Miami

Tuesday, 4/20/03, 8:30-10:30 am

Cognitive Neuroscience and Genetics
Chairs:
Ian H. Robertson, Trinity College Dublin
B.J. Casey, Weill Medical College of Cornell
University Speakers:
John Fossella, Weill Medical College of Cornell
University
Sarah Durston, Rudolf Magnus Institute for
Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, the
Netherlands and Sackler Institute for Developmental
Psychobiology, Cornell Medical Center
Mark A. Bellgrove, Trinity College Dublin
David Skuse, Institute of Child Health, London, UK

Endophenotypes are quantitive traits that are thought to be
less removed from relevant gene action than broad phenotypes
that are based upon behavioural traits. In recent times
there has been an increase in the number of studies
utilizing endophenotypes where relationships with genotype
are sought. The use of endophenotypes in genetic studies has
yielded greater interaction between cognitive neuroscients
and molecular geneticists than has previously been the case.
In this symposium, we review recent advances made in the
study of the relationship between genetics and cognition in
both normality and complex psychiatric conditions, such as
ADHD. The speakers in this symposium provide different but
complementary approaches to the study of endophenotypes,
with investigations ranging from the use of
neuropsychological measures, to structural brain changes
observed on MRI, to alterations in task-related functional
brain activity with function MRI.

Mapping the genetic variation of executive attention onto
brain activity
John Fossella, Weill Medical College of Cornell
University Combining Neuroimaging and Genetic approaches to
understanding ADHD
Sarah Durston, Rudolf Magnus Institute for
Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, the
Netherlands and Sackler Institute for Developmental
Psychobiology, Cornell Medical Center ADHD candidate genes
and Neuropsychological Endophenotypes
Mark A. Bellgrove, Michael Gill & Ian H. Roberston,
Trinity College Dublin X-linked genes, sexual dimorphism and
the development of social cognition
Skuse DH�, Oreland L*, Lawrence K�, Morris J�
Sklar
P#, Lander E#. �� Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
*Dept. of Neuroscience, University of Uppsala, Sweden, #
Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Cambridge, MA, USA.

Tuesday, 4/20/03, 1:30-3:30 pm

Spatial Maps for Perception & Action

Chair:
Lynn C. Robertson, University of California, Berkeley
and Veterans Affairs, Martinez, CA Speakers:
Michael S. A. Graziano, Princeton University
Krista Schendel, Veterans Affairs, Martinez, CA &
University of California, Berkeley
Leon Y. Deouell, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
Israel
Lynn C. Robertson, University of California, Berkeley

The idea that multiple spatial maps are created and
represented in the brain is one that has received increasing
attention over the last few years. Evidence from animal
studies, neurological patients, and functional imaging have
converged upon the notion that several different spatial
representations are created, maintained, and even updated in
specific cortical areas. The exact function of this
neuroanatomical network of specialized spatial maps and its
role in perception and action has not yet been clearly
identified. Nonetheless, the existence of multiple spatial
representations associated with different areas within the
brain has changed some basic assumptions about �what�
and
�where� processing in the brain. The issues explored in
this
symposium focus on various spatial maps and the role they
may play in primary and secondary vision, audition, and
action. Just as modern physics was influenced by a more
complete understanding of how physical space is organized,
understanding how the brain mentally repre

sents and organizes space and how these representations
affect our perceptual experience and actions may result in a
better understanding of the cognitive and neural basis of
conscious awareness.

Complex Movements Evoked by Stimulation of Motor Cortex
Michael S. A. Graziano, Princeton University
Spatial Maps in Human Vision
Krista Schendel, Veterans Affairs, Martinez, CA &
University of California, Berkeley Space Representations in
Vision and Audition and their Relationship to Conscious
Awareness
Leon Y. Deouell, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
Israel Implicit and Explicit Awareness of Space
Lynn C. Robertson, University of California, Berkeley

Poster Guidelines and Specifications

Effective Posters
A poster should be complete and self-supporting so that
different viewers may read at their leisure. The author
should only need to supplement or discuss particular points
raised during inquiry. Remember that several people of
varying degrees of interest and experience may be viewing
your poster at once. Therefore, you will want to make your
points as complete and brief as possible.

Planning
Posterboards are 4� tall x 8� wide; we recommend using a
space of 4� tall x 6� wide for your entire poster. The
most
effective use of the space would be in grid plan arranged in
columns. This prevents viewers from having to cross back and
forth in front of each other. Materials should be mounted on
colored poster paper or board. Allow for distance when
printing and planning layouts. The standard elements are:
Introduction, Methods, Results (with supporting figures),
and a Conclusion or Summary. Type should be easily seen from
a short distance. Using the guidelines above, the
introduction would be placed at the upper left, and the
conclusion at the lower right, both in large type. It is not
necessary to post a copy of the abstract.

Illustrations
Figures should also be easily seen from a distance. Use
clear graphics and large type to accomplish this. The main
points should be straightforward without extended viewing,
but details should be included for those who might wish to
discuss it. Because the amount of text is restricted, the
figure legend could contain some of the commentary that
would usually be contained in the body of a manuscript.

Text
* Minimize narrative.�
* Use large type in short separated paragraphs.
* Do not set entire paragraphs in boldface or capital
letters. * Numbered or bulleted lists are a concise but
effective way to convey a series of points.

Title
Prepare a banner for the top of the poster indicating the
abstract title, author(s) and affiliations(s). Lettering
should be about 1 1/4 inches high for the title, 3/4 inches
high for the author’s names and 1/2 inch high for
affiliations.

Poster Sessions
All abstracts will be programmed as poster sessions unless
otherwise notified. Poster sessions are scheduled on Sunday,
April 18, Monday, April 19, and Tuesday, April 20. The
presenting author should be present at least one full hour
during the assigned session and the other authors should be
present during the remaining time. The doors to the poster
room will open at 7:30 a.m.; you may post your materials on
the board assigned to you at that time. The doors will close
for the evening at 6:00 pm. Do not leave personal items in
the poster room.

Poster Schedule
To see when your poster is scheduled, download the excel
spreadsheet at
http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns/Posters.htm.

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